The Painful Part of Wholeness (with Catalyst)

I’m excited to start contributing with Catalyst Leader. Here’s a preview of my first piece with them on how we can and must lean toward our pain to be whole. Read the rest via the link at the end.

They led a church small group. They opened their home every single week to a group of fifteen, making space for prayer, Scripture, and connection—which is why it shocked everyone when the husband shared he recently found out his wife was having an affair and didn’t plan to stop.The church’s pastors and elders were stunned; the small group was confused; no one knew quite what to do.

Shame and pain lurk under the surface of every soul, and most of us aren’t quite sure how to acknowledge the havoc they create. The more stories of hidden pain I encounter as a therapist and pastor’s wife, the more I am convinced there is no greater threat to the health of the Church than Christian leaders avoiding their own pain. And the even more sobering truth is that avoiding our pain, wounds, and sin is a subtle, often subconscious force impacting each of us more than we realize. It’s not just the small group leaders with secret marriage problems.

As leaders, we face pressure to project an image of being more than the gospel actually asks us to be. We languish in the tension between two powerful narratives: the alluring cultural narrative of strength as success and the more vulnerable narrative of weakness as the ground of both our greatest redemption and most powerful ministry.

Click to read the rest over at Catalyst.

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